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Sam and Dave Dig a Hole, by Marc Barnett
      
With perfect pacing, the multi-award-winning, New York Times best-selling team of Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen dig down for a deadpan tale full of visual humor.

Sam and Dave are on a mission. A mission to find something spectacular. So they dig a hole. And they keep digging. And they find . . . nothing. Yet the day turns out to be pretty spectacular after all. Attentive readers will be rewarded with a rare treasure in this witty story of looking for the extraordinary — and finding it in a manner you’d never expect.




Always Remember, by Cece Meng
         
A lyrically told, beautifully illustrated book that brings comfort to children--and adults--who have lost someone they love

After Old Turtle swims his last swim and breathes his last breath, and the waves gently take him away, his friends lovingly remember how he impacted each and every one of them. As the sea animals think back on how much better Old Turtle made their lives and their world, they realize that he is not truly gone, because his memory and legacy will last forever.
 
Jago's gorgeous illustrations accompany Cece Meng's serene text in a book that will help chidren understand and cope with the death of a loved one.
  




The House That Zack Built, by Alison Murray
      
A buzzy fly and a mischievous kitten make a mess on the farm in this contemporary twist on a classic rhyme.

This is the fly that 
buzzed on by 
over the house 
that Zack built . . .

Readers in the know may recognize Zack and his trusty dog, Rufus, from Alison Murray’s Hickory Dickory Dog. Now Zack is enjoying a day on the farm, building an amazing house with his blocks. But nearby, a wandering fly has attracted the attention of an inquisitive and determined feline. Stalking and chasing through stylish illustrations, the cat unintentionally creates havoc. Sleeping dog and serene lambs scatter, and the fly lands precariously on top of Zack’s house. What will Zack do? Children will buzz over this delightful read-aloud — and parents and teachers will appreciate Zack’s commonsense clean-up.




When Green Becomes Tomatoes, by Julie Fogliano
         

december 29
and i woke to a morning
that was quiet and white
the first snow
(just like magic) came on tip toes
overnight

Flowers blooming in sheets of snow make way for happy frogs dancing in the rain. Summer swims move over for autumn sweaters until the snow comes back again. In Julie Fogliano's skilled hand and illustrated by Julie Morstad's charming pictures, the seasons come to life in this gorgeous and comprehensive book of poetry.





There Is a Tribe of Kids, by Lane Smith
         

When a young boy embarks on a journey alone . . .
he trails a colony of penguins,
undulates in a smack of jellyfish,
clasps hands with a constellation of stars,
naps for a night in a bed of clams,
and follows a trail of shells, 
home to his tribe of friends.

If Lane Smith's Caldecott Honor Book Grandpa Green was an homage to aging and the end of life,There Is a Tribe of Kids is a meditation on childhood and life's beginning. Smith's vibrant sponge-paint illustrations and use of unusual collective nouns such as smack and unkindness bring the book to life. Whimsical, expressive, and perfectly paced, this story plays with language as much as it embodies imagination.





Dara Palmer's Major Drama, by Emma Shevah
         

"'The lead role of Maria in The Sound of Music goes to ..."
I could practically hear her say "Dara Palmer." This was going to be my big break! But what really came out of my teacher's mouth was "Ella Moss-Daniels."
My heart went huuuuggggggghhhhht.

Dara Palmer longs for stardom-but when she isn't cast in her middle school's production of The Sound of Music, she get suspicious. It can't be because she's not the best. She was born to be a famous movie star. It must because she's adopted from Cambodia and doesn't look like a typicalfraulein. (That's German for girl.)

So irrepressible Dara comes up with a genius plan to shake up the school: write a play about her own life. Then she'll have to be the star.

Praise for Dream On, Amber:
Booklist 2015 Top 10 First Novels for Youth
Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2015





Deep in the Woods , by Christopher Corr
         

Deep in the woods is a little wooden house, with nine neat windows and a red front door. When a little mouse decides it will make the perfect home, so do the other animals in the wood - including a great big bear!

But will the bear be able to put everything right when their home comes tumbling down? Find out in this beautifully illustrated retelling of a classic Russian folk tale.





Green Pants , by Kenneth Kraegel
         
For kids who march to their own drummer — or are especially attached to a comfort object — here is a completely adorable character who wears his singularity in style.

Jameson only ever wears green pants. When he wears green pants, he can do anything. But if he wants to be in his cousin’s wedding, he’s going to have to wear a tuxedo, and that means black pants. It’s an impossible decision: Jameson would love nothing more than to be in his cousin's wedding, but how can he not wear green pants? Will Jameson turn down this big honor, or will he find a way to make everyone happy, including himself? In this pitch-perfect ode to individualism, acclaimed author-illustrator Kenneth Kraegel creates a character readers of all ages can root for — whatever color pants they wear.




Real Friends, by Shannon Hale
         

Newbery Honor author Shannon Hale and New York Times bestselling illustrator LeUyen Pham join forces in this graphic memoir about how hard it is to find your real friends―and why it's worth the journey.

When best friends are not forever . . .

Shannon and Adrienne have been best friends ever since they were little. But one day, Adrienne starts hanging out with Jen, the most popular girl in class and the leader of a circle of friends called The Group. Everyone in The Group wants to be Jen's #1, and some girls would do anything to stay on top . . . even if it means bullying others.

Now every day is like a roller coaster for Shannon. Will she and Adrienne stay friends? Can she stand up for herself? And is she in The Group―or out?





Bruce's Big Move, by Ryan T. Higgins
         
After the events of Hotel Bruce, our favorite curmudgeonly bear shares his home with not only his four geese, but three rowdy mice besides! Fed up with their shenanigans, Bruce sets off to find a rodent-free household. But as usual, nothing goes quite according to plan. . .



A Hippy-Hoppy Toad , by Peggy Archer
         
From the illustrator of the award-winning Sophie's Squash comes a rollicking read-aloud featuring a very tiny toad who gets displaced as animals--and humans--brush past him on the road.

In the middle of a puddle
in the middle of a road
on a teeter-totter twig
sat a teeny-tiny toad. 
Snap! went the twig! 
Up went the toad! 
And he landed on a tree 
by the side of the road.

It's hard to be a tiny toad minding your own business on a twig. First a bird pecks at him. . . . Then a bee buzzes. . . . Then a dog barks . . . and so on. And each time the toad is surprised by a buzz or a woof (or the toe of a sneaker!), he hops to a new location farther down the road. With fun sounds, clever rhymes, and an irresistible rhythm, this is the perfect story for sharing one-on-one or in a group.



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